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plate said that she was recovering well. >> i expect her to recover and continue with our education and hopefully go on to university. >> that education is the point, the cost for which he suffered, and to which she is now devoted. >> when you educate a girl, you educate the whole family. you educate a generation. you educate all the other coming children. >> in launching the malala fund, she shows a determination to turn this terrible experience into something positive. quite courage and resolution have turned a 15-year-old schoolgirl into a powerful, global symbol of the right of girls to be educated. >> she said god has given her a second life and she will use it well. >> what an extraordinary young woman. as she continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister
working meals not social occasions winston churchill loved them. he used the hour the sphoant educate others about the policy to persuade them to go along and learn from the guests the latest and political social goes gossip and get news from around the world. there was no 24-news cycle in those dais. private reports of well-placed guests were often the best source of what was going on in se the soviet union. his guests came from all walks of life both during the war they were mainly military and politicians british and american. and when winston churchill felt he could tolerate it he had to dine with charles. but there was always a purpose to the dinners toed a van his country's interest to explain, cajole, to learn, to exchange information, it was the conversation that mattered. the setting the table and the food were the stage which he would perform. here are two examples examples with important dib -- inners. white house in december of 1911 and a second one in 1942 when winston churchill after the grueling and dangerous flights to avoid german fighters in the air flew to moscow to
is assassinated in front of his home. >> the german education minister is stripped of her document for playing it -- her doctorate for plagiarism, and the opposition calls for her resignation. >> the political crisis in tunisian deepened dramatically tonight following the assassination of a top opposition leader and the violent unrest that has followed in the wake of his killing. troops have been deployed in a number of locations to restore order. >> the killing of the prominent secular politician has sparked protests across the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist organizations have a reputation of terrorist groups. history is a witness. it is not possible to discuss, negot
to educate members and then get them to listen to their constituents and give us feedback as to what we can do that will work and that will be something acceptable to the public. lou: mr. chairman, may i congratulate you? you have just become the first congressman or senator with whom i have spoken on this issue of the course of the past decade to say that he did not want to go out to educate the american people but rather to educate congress and go out to the american people to hear their views, concerns, thoughts, and ideas. naturally, sincerely company you for that and i think that is such a critically important perspective of our nation's leader. >> we have representative democracy, and a lot of people overlook that when they look to a congress to rush in to solve a problem, * we russian -- we had to push past something that does not solve the problem or did it builds up to a large piece of legislation and then it collapses as immigration reform it in the senate a few years ago neither of those approaches is good. i think the approach of looking at each aspect of this program and trying
for failed education systems, failed school systems to get their acts together. throughout the country there are some promising signs that we can bring schools and parents together to improve our educational system. san francisco public schools adopted a funding mechanism according to what's termed a weighted student formula. under this policy the more students a school attracts, the more money that school, its administrators and teachers receive. low-income students are weighted heavier and the funding forum as our children with disabilities, and those learning english as a second language. so there's incentives are schools to seek the more vulnerable population, and reasons for schools to differentiate themselves and to excel. imagine if we were to try and move in this direction with federal funding. allow the money we truly spend to actually follow individual children. students, including those without a lot of money for those with special needs, we be able to access a school which would give them a shot at having a successful life, a shot at earning their success and achieving thei
'll advance proposals aimed at producing results in areas like education, health health, innovation, and job growth. our solutions will be based on the conservative principles of self-reliance, faith in the individual, trust in family, and accountability in government. our goal is to ensure that every american has a fair shot to earn success and achieve their dreams. it's my hope that i can stand before you two years from now and report you that our side, as well as the president's, found within us the ability to set differences aside in order to provide relief to so many millions of americans who just want their life to work again. in so many countries in history, children were largely confined to the same station in life as their parents, but not here. because here we've seen the son of a shoe man become the president of the united states. we have seen a daughter of a poor single mom develop and build a company that turned into her being the oregon of a tv network. in america, the grandson of poor immigrants, who fled russia, come here, and that grandson became the majority leader of the h
budget is up to 20% and the next decade is 30% of our budget. it takes away from education, infrastructure, other health and human service needs. so medicaid and the need to have flexibility is something we are go to go watch as we go forward. let me finish where i started. we need to address the rising costs of health care. i don't think the affordable care act does that. we have provided an opportunity with our health care exchange in utah is a model based on good principles that allows businesses to provide as a benefit and health with competitive forces and consumer control to, in fact, have an impact on the rising costs of health care. it may be imperfect, but it's a step in the right direction. again, the fundamental position i'm taking and we're taking in utah is that the free market works if you allow it. and takes politicians like myself and others to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so anxious to fix the problem, that we don't let the marketplace make the adjustments necessary to get the right outcome. and again as i sa
is that within the education budget we have prioritized the per pupil funding so that has been a reduction in per pupil funding because i think it's very important schools can see forward to future years, the source -- a source of budget they will have. the second thing we've done is obviously for the academy program is to encourage the devolution of more of the schools budget to the schools directly and i still think there's more that we can achieve on that agenda. >> mr. speaker, the prime minister said he would give the public a strong voice in the nhs. his former health secretary said he would have since of the nhs. why then -- [inaudible] rejected by the government last night? >> we do want to see patients have a stronger voice in the nhs and we are about to debate i think at some length some terms of the staff how that is done. i think one of the most important ways is going to be making sure that the mandates of the nhs commission board has at its heart quality nursing, or day care, and the voice of patients. we also need to look at how health watch is going to work to make sure it is tru
today calling for change. he wants republicans to focus more on issues like education and health care and spend less time talking about the deficit. congressman cantor is with us this morning. >> good morning. >> you've got a big speech today asking the republican party to change. is this about tone or ideology? >> what this is about is about making sure that we can express why we're doing what we're doing. we believe very strongly obviously in things like fiscal discipline and not spending money you don't have we also believe in that, because it helps people, in the same way we've got to address the plight of so many working americans right now, and those who don't have any work and say that yes, we've got policies that will help you in terms of giving you an opportunity for quality education, in terms of trying to help you bring down the costs of health care. we've got some real policies that we want to put to work to help people and that's what this is about. >> so on policy and on immigration reform will you today endorse the proposal put forward by senator
budget which means it takes money away from other areas like education infrastructure and other health service needs. medicaid and the need to have flexibility is going to be certainly something we will watch as we go forward. let me finish by ending where i started. we need to address the rising cost of health health health ca. i don't think the affordable care act does that. i think we have provided an opportunity with their health care exchange and utah that allows businesses to contain to provide benefits and help with competitive forces and consumer control to in fact have an impact on the rising cost of health care. it may be imperfect but it's a step i think in the right direction. again the fundamental position that i'm taking and we are taking in utah is the free market works if we will allow it. it takes politicians like himself and others out there to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so i just a problem that we don't look at making adjustments that are necessary to get the right outcome. and as i said, if we want the best quality
, education, and taxes. this is 45 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i am the president of the american enterprise institute and i am pleased to welcome eric cantor today. it is an important policy speech entitled making life work. now, an ordinary introduction of his political career and rise to majority leader and talk about his new legislative accomplishment, his career, as most of you know, is not a collection of accomplishment, but a long-term effort to make it better, or country for all americans. here is someone who pauses to remember the why of public policy, valuing justice for all, protecting the vulnerable, and fighting against class divisions in american life. he knows that it leads to a happy and more prosperous life for more people. he cares about those who are being left behind, people that are looking for work and cannot find it. people who raised barriers of starting business and building another life. eric cantor knows that policy analysis as an american or someone who wants to become an american, is very important. here is the reason that i admire him
the money on the 25-year term demanded by his education secretary? will he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? perhaps he might say -- optamus schola nova, we need a new school? >> i'll leave the latin to the mayor of london but would have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is it you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what the previous labor government did in their early terms. the money is there. in terms of the banks, the funding lending scheme from the bank of england, evidence shows it is having an effect on lowering interest rates and reforming p.f.i. but also offering infrastructure guarantees, something the treasury never has done before to help projects go ahead. >> damian hinds? >> nothing is more important in the early years education than the caring people delivering it. does the prime minister agree raising the bar and elevating their status will help the prestige to the profession and help parents give children the best start in life? >> i think my honorable friend is absolutely light and
trained people in the war zone and educational where, that you lack the capability to have well-trained individuals that you can deploy elsewhere. and that creates a real readiness crisis for us. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you. >> thank you very much, senator. senator bloomen that is next. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to join my colleagues in thanking you, secretary panetta for your extraordinary service to our nation, and the personal sober and time that you are have devoted to all of us on the panel and other members of the congress. general dempsey, thank you as well for your service. and to both of you for your forthright and credible and significant testimony today explaining some answers to questions that are painful, i think, for all of us, and i know for you having attended the services and ceremonies in honor of these brave patriots and heroes, as you call them, and also your knowledge personally of them. and i'm struck as senator senator kaine was by the provocative i would prefer to call it powerful statement you offered regarding the effect on the nati
bonuses simply refuse to lend the money on the 25 year term demanded by his education secretary? would he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? [laughter] we need our new school. >> i will leave the latin to the mayor of london if that's all right but also to have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is if you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what was previously labour government did in his earlier to pick the money is there. entrance of the banks, the funding for lenny seen from the bank of england, i think it is having an effect at lowering interest rates. we are reforming but we're also offering infrastructure guarantees, something the treasury has never done before, to help projects go ahead. >> thank you nothing is more important than the caring people delivering it. does the prime minister agree that raising the bar, elevating their space will help us teach the profession to poor parenting to children the best possible start in life? >> i think my honorable friend is right and i would pay tribute
of the healthcare spending. that is an important point. >> let's switch to another passionate topic. education. quite a few questions from the audience on how much can we afford to fund and where should we be funding and investing in the educational system? should it be done on a national level or a state level? >> let's mix it up, you go first. >> i have read that test scores of american elementary and secondary educational students have not increased and the famous nation at risk report in the early 1980's. even though spending has increased dramatically. i question whether the solution to the problem is, let's take those systems and pour money into it are. it's hard to argue against earning more money, that and possibly hurt. but you basically have major structural flaws in the way the system is organized. it is not producing the results that we need. i strongly believe that -- i would say, after entitlement spending, i would put the quality of our educational outcomes as the greatest long-term threat to america's economic strength. it is the most important thing, and it has to do with stru
of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing professional education, credits for accounting professional. so we are quite excited of that and hopefully you will as well. this accreditation highlights the value of this and other programs that would hold her at the chamber. for more information on that please visit our website, or speak to some of folks outside in the registration desk. after the video i'm going to ask marty to come up directly and begin the program the first award from our sponsor, the gfi group. >> good morning. gfi group is delighted to continue its support of the national chamber foundation's quarterly economic briefing. the goal is to affect the impact of public policy on u.s. bases and the global economy. gfi group is an american company headquartered in new york city with shares trade on the new stock exchange. gfi employs close to 2000 people and over a dozen offices and most of the world's major financial centers. as you meet us when gfi employs are hard at work around the globe and here in new york and executing billions of dollars in transactions ac
for public education as to how you should be doing these things. if you join the nra and go to one of the 80,000 trainers you get that. there are a lot of people that aren't nra members. the public education campaign on the safety of firearms would be great. we would love to support it. >> first of all, i would like to get the signup sheet for the field trip for the gun show. [laughter] >> i'll tell you what, the next time they have the gun show, i'll have a signup sheet. if anybody wants to go i'll take them. i can't get you in for free. >> sometimes so you a little bit of an expense. [laughter] >> there's been a lot of talk about whether this is different. and it's a political question not an ideological question. do you think this time is different? and if it is, it doesn't seem that the nra has changed in any way the positions on what is acceptable or not acceptable to reflect that. i have another question. i'll let you answer that one. >> sure. i think that our opponents hope this is different in the sense they hope they can use a motion to achieve an antifirearm agenda they haven't bee
. the average american, who had grade school education in 1940, now had completed high school. americans were making more money and working fewer hours. they enjoyed the good life. for most people, the benefits of economic growth were there for the taking. but by the end of the 1960s, hidden costs appeared. automobiles dumped 230,000 tons of carbon monoxide a day into the air. los angeles air was hazardous most of the year. oil spills in the santa barbara channel fouled miles of beaches. pesticide spraying was threatening many species of birds. pesticide spills killed some 15 million fish in arkansas. three million acres of hillsides lay stripped bare for their coal. and in cleveland, the local industrial sewer, the cuyahoga river, caught fire. environmentalists had found a loophole in the gnp. the gnp measures goods and services traded, for example, scrubbers used to clean sulfur emissions. clean air isn't bought or sold, so it's not counted. if sulfur is not cleaned up, the resulting pollution is not subtracted. gnp is not reduced. gnp fails to take into account environmental values. if we
is implemented. the other thing is education. educate the young players at an early age. invest in a 10-year time, but it may be too late. it has already targetted things like the no. 17 world cup. if they pitch up and buy in at munich, they cannot say they are done because his name will be in the papers. it's an insidious problem that will demand a concerted effort. >> and this is just the beginning of the story, i'm sure. thanks so much, titus. >> of low and behold, more corruption. the spanish prime minister facing questions over corruption allegations and has won praise from german chancellor angela merkel for his handling of the economic crisis. he has imposed a harsh austerity measures and lowered borrowing costs, but the spanish economy is continuing to contract. >> the german chancellor warmly welcome the spanish premier, a change of pace for the prime minister facing the problems at home. he traveled to berlin wristbands that the. ever deeper into-- he traveled to berlin with spain even deeper into the concession. >> i reiterated once again that we're full of respect for the reforms impl
to me. she was great. she is articulate, very well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos. but the press would not give her the same accolades, the general media would not give for this and accolades, not because she was competent, but because of her political ideology. there is some dispute bi -- skewed bias rating hillary clinton for some of the wrong things. host: on twitter -- "the washington post" adds this as far as analysis of her time in office -- "many of clinton's successes appeared to be due largely to her personal popularity and famous work ethics, attributes that were on display in her final days in office." nevada. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. i think the only reason she ever had her job was because of her husband, bill. she did exactly what she has been told to do by the president's, and a lot of us are not on tune with president obama's schedule, especially this benghazi deal. whenever a person throws her hands up in the air and is not want to admit to any responsibility of a job done po
's behavior by members of the military and a savings plan and he finds financial education program substantially increased savings in the tsp have had no or sunpak, for example, on the amount of credit for military members have outstanding. so re-signing of crowd out there. the society by my colleague at harvard looking at denmark are much better data and they are so concerned about privacy. when they look at automatic savings programs, they found little cutout and other parts of the balance sheet either. so i think it's a legitimate concern, though most of the evidence suggests certainly it's not one-for-one offset. >> any other thoughts on the crowd out at all ms. mccarthy? >> i would offer we don't have it. the complexity it would affect the asset the pain is difficult. it's important on the automatic enrollment is a significant impact in getting participants into the plan. our enrollment rate, participation rate is 67% previous automatic enrollment 80%. it's a very powerful distinction in and of itself is so dramatic that it's hard for me to think is creating a big distraction
, indiscrim nat cuts to things like education and training, national security will cost us jobs and it will slow down our recovery. it's not the right thing to do for the economy. it's not the right thing for folks who are out there still looking for work. the good news is this doesn't have to happen. for all the drama and disagreements that we've had over the past two years, democrats and republicans have still been able to come together and cut the deficit by more than 2.5 trillion dollars through a mix of spending cuts and higher rates on taxes for the wealthy. so a balanced approach has achieved more than 2.5 trillion dollars in deficit reduction. that's more than halfway towards the $4 trillion in deficit reduction that economists and elected officials from both parties believe is required to stabilize our debt, so we've made progress. i still believe we can finish the job with a balanced mix of spending cuts and more tax reform. the proposals that i put forward during the fiscal cliff negotiations in discussions with speaker boehner and others are still very much on the ta
of living, how your land costs, higher child care costs and education costs, and not just that but if you look back historically and the industrial society in the agrarian society you have seven kids and you are working on a family farm there is a healthy hand. when you are working in the factories and to bring the increased work children are simply a cost and this is one of those factors pushing us in that direction. another big change. the nature of the welfare state that excess in 19th century america. we were basically on our own and our children to care. one of the basic reasons to have children. you have a gaggle of kids and one of them at least is a good and now we don't need to have that anymore. we have social security and medicare and it's nice to have a child to look after you and watch more jeopardy but it's no longer necessary. and it's all these little things. these changes, some bigger, some smaller has pushed us in the direction of having fewer and fewer children >> host: back to the issue that you raised. you mentioned this around the book. you talk about the increasing p
schoolteacher is getting a national educator award worth $25,000. the surprise announcement happened this morn at ann beers elementary school. megan mcgrath was there and joins us live to tell us what happened. tell us a it. >> it was a big surprise, barbara. you can see the sign behind me, ann be anne beers elementary school, home of the cheetahs. now it's home to one of the best teachers in the country. it was billed as a celebration of school achievement. but when philanthropist took the microphone it soon became obvious that something special was afoot. >> how much is this now? >> reporter: with help of the students he used flash card to write out the number $25,000. then came the big surprise. the third grade teacher, jacqueline simms, was getting a check for that amount, $25,000. she had no idea. >> oh, my gosh. i'm completely surprised. completely surprised. i'm in awe. i never would have imagined that i would have been receiving this award today. >> reporter: jacqueline simms is the winner of the milken educator award, an honor given to teachers who ro moat excellence in schools and ha
and higher education cost and not just that but if we look back historically and we move from an agrarian society to an industrial society children are free work, right? you have seven kids and to work on a family farm and by the time the kids are 10 years old there is a helping hand. when you live in the city and working in factories and doing increasingly mechanized work children are not that help. they are simply a cost. this is one of those factors pushing us in that direction. now another big change is the nature of the welfare state. this is something which didn't exist in ninteenth-century 19thy ninteenth-century america. we were basically on our own. as we got older children to care of us in one of the basic reasons to have children. you have a gaggle of kids and you hope that one of them at least it's a good one and will look after you. and now we don't need to have that anymore. we have social security and medicare. it's still nice to have a child ... and to look at you as you begin to drool and watch more jeopardy but it's no longer necessary. all these little things and these
. i'm elected mayor in mali. now, i'm a u.s. educated, but i've returned back home. the question i would like to ask is directed to ricardo, even though it is based on peter's introduction, that mali was a failed state, that the issue in mali was a leadership issue, not an ethnic or religious issues. but primarily a leadership issue. and i thank you for truly addressing that. now, you talk about leadership in mali. why should we organize elections? because democracy is a value. that should be enforced everywhere, even in mali. there is an emerging class of leaders, but they are unheard. they are suppressed by bad leadership. leadership should be organized because you would have mali and identified -- after to the question, what should we do next? before the election. is hold a national conference as we did in 1991. to bring malians from all force and craft and dedicate integration plan into mali as it has been done before. but on wrong premises. so it is time that we address this in a global point of view instead of just pointing out to arabs, because it is impractical to have that
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
an education -- [applause] >> i guess the question is of fairness. you shouldn't have two systems, one where based on your race or class you can access treatment and move on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma
. it's appropriate i do this at georgetown. as the product of jesuit education, as a catholic and as a beneficiary over the years of your outstanding faculty and staff and your important policy contributions that this university has made in a number of areas that affect people of this country. i'm truly honored to have this opportunity today. i've had a deep and abiding respect for georgetown throughout the almost 40 to 50 years that i've been involved in public service. and i have a deep respect for the generation of leaders that have gone forward from this campus to serve our nation. i just had the opportunity to meet with your cadets. some of the cadets in the rotc program. as someone who went through the rotc program at santa clara university and then ultimately served two years in the army, i can tell you that i have tremendous admiration for those that have made the decision to serve this country in uniform. the talents of these men and women and the innovative programs at georgetown's new institute of women, peace and security underscore for me the university's leadersh
education, training, energy and national security will cost us jobs it will slow down our recovery. it is not the right thing to do for the economy, it is not the right thing for folks that are out there still looking for work. the good news is this does not have to happen. for all the drama and disagreements we have had over the last few years, democrats and republicans have been able to come together and cut the deficit by more than $2.5 trillion through a mix of spending cuts and higher rates on taxes for the wealthy. a balanced approach has achieved more than $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. that is more than halfway towards the $4 trillion in deficit reduction that economists and elected officials from both parties believe it is required to save our debt. i believe we can finish the job with a balanced mix of spending cuts and more tax reform. the proposals that i put forward during the fiscal cliff negotiations, and discussions with speaker boehner and others, are still very much on the table. i just want to repeat, do deals that i fell forward, the balanced approach of sp
of our endeavors and the second one, we are focused on educating physicians in a way that will allow them to participate in this future that is more team based and quite different than the medicine of the past. if there, thinking of the physician sustainability and practice so that physicians can do what they love to do and that is take care of the patient. let me say as a recovering dean and hospital system ceo and now ceo of the ama i have learned to always try to jump in and of adjudicator early conflicts before the blood. so, with grace, len, tom and alladi in our view there is more to become nothing more eloquent than the high road and care. thank you. [applause] >> some news out of washington energy secretary of state chu announced he will resign once his successor is confirmed in a memo to colleagues received by politico. the former prisoners of he's eager to return to california and academic life. the white house released a statement by the press in which he said steve brought to the energy department a unique understanding of both the urgent challenge presented by climate change
are struggling during this financial crisis. we get calls related to those. we are trying to educate homeowners about that so they did not become victims in the first place. but a lot of people will lose their homes of the situation. host: christy romero, special inspector general for tarp. the question about the teeth -- question of to this executive pay, if treasury signed off on it, what can sigtarp really do? guest: we make recommendations to treasury and a half to be dealt with. we also report to congress. we send these reports to congress and congress helps put teeth in it. but a ultimately we have a lot of recommendations that are not implemented and they need to be. this is an example that shows how bad it can be a treasury does not implement the recommendation. i am looking forward to a new secretary of treasury coming in to talk about those recommendations and changes that can be made. and we will not give up. we will look at 2013 pay. we will not stop. because alternately we are here to protect taxpayers. host: amelia, ohio. democrats' line. caller: how are you? my question is about
to live without. embarrassment's and education and infrastructure. research and development -- investments and education and infrastructure. already republicans and democrats of work together to reduce deficits by $2.50 trillion. that is a good start. to get the rest of the way, we need a balanced set of reforms. for example, we need to lower the cost of health care and programs like medicare that are the biggest drivers of the deficit. these reforms must go hand in hand with eliminating excess spending in the tax code so the wealthiest individuals can ticket veg of loopholes and deductions the kind of bailable to most americans. it can be a year solid growth, more jobs, and higher wages. that will only happen of reporters up to self-inflicted wounds. host: the president in his weekly address. the earlier debt limit with $16.40 trillion. we have surpassed that. you can keep track of it at it is now $60.50 trillion. the next debate over the debt limit is likely to come up mid may. a story from "the weekly standard." we need a better argument against the debt. she writes --
to reach out to the industry to come up with a way to really promote financial literacy and education before college level, getting into high schools so that we have an educated group of young folks who come out and understand about the importance of having a financial house in order, the importance of having a good credit history, the understanding what it means to be smart about using credit. >> you can watch that entire conversation with the chamber of commerce this afternoon right after the farewell ceremony for secretary of defense leon panetta, which is expected to start at about 3:45 p.m. eastern, and next tuesday night, president obama delivering his fourth state of the union address to a joint session of congress. it includes the president's speech at 9:00 and the republican response from florida senator marco rubio. that will be on c-span, c-span radio, and >> first lady helen taft on discussing politics. >> i always had the satisfaction of knowing almost as much as he about the politics and intricacies of any situation. i think any woman can discuss with her husb
that his son needs a good education for a better future -- despairs at the thought. >> i cannot invest in my son's future. he is in school and needs help, an i cant pay for a pvate tur. >> the rock of gibraltar -- without it, the situation in the border region would be even worse, but the spanish conservative government in madrid still complains. it stopped communicating with the colony. the accusations are well known. gibraltar's wealthy economic boon is only possible because it is a tax haven, a paradise for gamblers. for the people of gibraltar, it is pure slander. >> any independent review, such asy the international monetary fund, has shown that gibraltar is by most measures an extremely well regulated and well governed jurisdiction. >> gibraltar abolished certain tax benefits under pressure from the european union, before the spanish government, that is not enough, an attitude which makes gibraltar's neighbors angry. >> we cannot be the loser of an anti-gibraltar policy made in madrid. it is not a problem for us. it is an opportunity. >> people traveling from gibraltar to spain a
, moe children will be sufficiently educated. so if the teachers are profiting, i don't see the problem. >> you favor the authorities reaching out and grabbing hold of a piece of private enterprise and nationalizing. >> of course, anything that its liberal i'm for. also the issue of homework. this issue would copyright homework. >> i'm very much against that. what do people have rights to? the children doing their homework. create these wonderful projects. the school gets to own it? that doesn't make sense. >> where do you stand? >> i think this is a great area because we're talking about children here and are the parents going to agree? we're moving into a technological age and kids are creating apps at school and then sell it to facebook for a couple million dollars because of what they learned at school? i don't think that's a bad thing necessarily. >> there's nothing wrong with that. >> the problem is our teacher and parents and students collaborating to create things at school, and then profit off of it -- >> so what i they are? >> i think we have to distinguish that from the schoo
. a dutch theater troupe is on a mission to change that. they have come to berlin to educate children about online etiquette. in this play, these two want to become famous musicians. cady wants to help, but she goes too far. she convinces the girl to take off her clothes in a music video and upload it to the internet without permission. the situation escalates when she takes to face but to defend herself. the actors interact with the kids to learn about their own online experiences. >> a lot of them already have a very good idea about what is good and what is bad etiquette. but the knowledge is kind of scattered. one kid will know one thing and another will know something else. so if we can come together in a group and shared these pieces of knowledge, that is important to us. >> in this exercise, when students suggest that they not put the video online. it prevents a possible fallout. he and his classmates have learned a lot. >> i learned that i should not upload pictures like of a girl that i have taken pictures of, for instance, without asking her first. >> i will be more careful about p
education and training and invest in the future. >> i of europe goes for compromise at any cost and puts common policies, agriculture, and growth at risk as a result, i will oppose it. >> with opinions so clearly divided, german chancellor angela merkel was keen to play down the differences and talk up the prospects of reaching agreement. >> the starting positions are quite far apart. but speaking for germany, i say we will do everything we can to come to an agreement. because in times of uncertainty and high unemployment, it is essential for people to be able to plan their future. >> it is about politics, not just numbers. the trick will be to find a deal that allows each of the 27 national leaders to claim victory when they return home, and members of the european parliament have warned that if the budget makes too many cuts, they may veto the whole package. >> will there be a deal this time around? for more on the budget summit, let's go now live to brussels and our correspondent. the start of this conference has been put off. what is happening? >> let's be clear. the official start o
about the issues not by disrupting efforts to educate the members of this committee and the public and we will resume the hearing at the gentleman of california is recognized for that penalty for the five minutes for the disruption. >> could i get an extra minute for this month? [laughter] >> mabey. in several ways i want to associate myself with my good friend from illinois. i'm one of, 90 is older than you but that doesn't mean there is any difference in the baby boomers. we are going to enter the same. the immigration problems that predated my entrance and the gentleman's entrance into commerce. that group of disruptions really didn't understand my politics. we can get to a substantial if not complete immigration reform bill cuyahoga for 12 years of the committee of trying to get their it is my fervent hope this is that window of opportunity. i do have some concerns from earlier today i want to associate myself. i heard you say basically we should grow different crops in california as a resolution to leading labor that we can't seem to find. is that pretty well correct? >> no, w
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